Send me your sounds

ThingsThatMatter is a love woven tumblelog on everything new music and inspiration for clean ears and open minds. And vice versa.

You'll find lots of pearls from the world of neo-classical music—think Nils Frahm, Ólafur Arnalds, A Winged Victory for the Sullen, etc. But I also like to peek into other styles that are closely related like ambient, electronica, jazz, and experimental. And I share insights, photos and news I come across while hunting for new music.

So, mind your head, use some good headphones, and simply enjoy.

Oh, and I curate a free weekly digest which brings you all my musical findings directly into your mailbox. Subscribe, and as a thank you I will send you a previously unreleased track by neo-classical piano maestro Fabrizio Paterlini.

Thomas Raukamp

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As Gordon Hempton points out, silence isn’t necessarily an absence of sound but a presence all its own. And, in much the same way, physicist Janna Levin says, space isn’t necessarily quiet either. Working at her lab at Columbia University, she projects that the universe creates an aural footprint that “will be music to our ears because it will be the quiet echo of that moment of our creation of our observable universe.” If we can only pick it up…

In this presentation at TED 2011, she plays her projections of the sounds the universe makes — black holes merging and falling into one another, the “white noise of the Big Bang”. It’ll make you wonder about the biggest questions at the core of what it means to be a sentient being in this universe or the next.

20 plays
On Being with Krista Tippet,
On Being Podcast

Gordon Hempton says that silence is an endangered species. He defines real quiet as presence — not an absence of sound, but an absence of noise. The Earth, as he knows it, is a “solar-powered jukebox.” Quiet is a “think tank of the soul.”

Travelers to other bodies in our solar system would get to explore amazing sights and sounds. But while the sights have been well-documented using robotic probes, we are still quite ignorant of what it sounds like on other planets.

Now, a team from the University of Southampton in England has used its knowledge of acoustic properties to simulate the sounds of other worlds. The noises, some familiar and some quite alien, represent the rich acoustic diversity in our solar system.

[Read on]